• Welcome to I Bike Kansas!

    Welcome to I Bike Kansas!

  • Welcome to I Bike Kansas!

    Welcome to I Bike Kansas!


Vision Lenexa 2030 is a long-term plan for Lenexa that was developed in 2008.  This plan is a follow-up to the first plan, Vision 2020, that was developed in 1997.  According to the summary, the Vision 2030 plan was developed using a grass-roots-driven planning process involving a diverse group of citizens from all over the city.  The current 2030 plan was delivered to the Lenexa governing body nine years ago on October 7, 2008.  Mandy Stuke,  current city council person, was the Co-Chair for the plan and hundreds of individual citizens provided input.  This is a broad plan that establishes goals on several economic and quality of life topics.  One entire section of the plan is dedicated to Infrastructure and Transportation.  The Vision 2030 plan provides some very interesting insights and  encouraging news for bicycle and pedestrian advocates.

Here’s the vision statement for the Infrastructure and Transportation section of the plan.

Vision 2030: Infrastructure and Transportation Plan

Vision 2030: Infrastructure and Transportation Plan

I think this Vision Statement is pretty clear that Lenexa is interested in multi-modal transportation options.  What does multi-modal transportation mean?  Well, in the context of city planning, I think most people would agree it includes transportation options other than just automobiles.  The next sentence provides some additional context by specifying that transportation options should be environmentally friendly, among other things.  While this part of the vision statement does not specifically mention bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, anyone reading it would agree that this is what is being called for.  This vision statement is consistent with the “Complete Streets” approach that the city says it is interested in pursuing.

The vision statement is capped off with a statement that we want to provide “regional leadership by employing state-of-the-art” techniques.  So far I’m 100% behind this vision.  I think it lines up perfectly with what i Bike Lenexa is trying to accomplish.

The infrastructure and Transportation vision continues with 7 specific goals.   The second goal takes the leadership statement a little further and provides specifics about why being a leader is so important.  It also specifically calls out that promoting pedestrian and bicycle options as part of the goal.

Lenexa Vision 2030 goal #2

Lenexa Vision 2030 goal #2

This goal nails it exactly.  By focusing on “multi-modal transportation options, including pedestrian, bicycle, transit and personal vehicles…”, Lenexa will enhance its competitive advantage within the metropolitan area.  Bingo! We have a winner.

The plan does not stop there.  Goal #3 doubles down on the idea of regional leadership.

Lenexa Vision 2020 goal #3

Lenexa Vision 2020 goal #3

This goal stresses how leading in developing transportation options will:

  1. attract and retain high-quality businesses and residents
  2. retain high level of satisfaction for residents
  3. protect its own vital interests

So, what have we learned?

This grass-roots driven planning process sets pretty clear goals for transportation and infrastructure planning.  These goals are very closely aligned with the goals of the bicycle and pedestrian community.  The plan places a very high priority and value on developing our infrastructure in order to attract business, remain competitive, and protect our vital interests.  All of this is great – right!?

So what happened?

Now, here’s where the wheels come off.  This plan was developed and presented to the city NINE years ago!  It’s been well documented that Lenexa has fallen behind the rest of the city in developing bicycle infrastructure.  I’ve received comments from leaders of several different bicycle and pedestrian advocacy groups that Lenexa doesn’t seem to care about bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure and that they have not actively participated like many other cities.  Just in case you haven’t seen it yet, here’s a picture we developed showing the on-street bicycle infrastructure in Lenexa vs. the rest of the area.

 

Lenexa - on-street bicycle infrastructure

City map of Lenexa showing on-street bicycle infrastructure.

All talk and no-action?

The experience with the Vision 2030 plan seems to back up the growing feeling that the city of Lenexa as all talk and no action.  Now, to be fair, we have seen Lenexa act very quickly on other issues that they think are important.  For example, at the last city council meeting, there was unanimous agreement to move forward on an ordinance to establish a common consumption area allowing residents to carry alcohol around City Center.  This is an innovative ordinance that, according to the city,  would be the first of it’s kind in the state!  So, when the city wants to move quickly and be innovative, it certainly can.

So, why has the city been so slow to act on this aspect of the Vision 2030 plan when it’s clearly identified as a high priority and is deemed critical to protect our vital interests?  I’m sure I could write many blog posts to try and explain all of the different reasons and I’m sure the city has many reasons why we haven’t made much progress.  But, based on my reading of the situation, here is my perspective of the contributing factors:

1) Many city leaders don’t buy into the plan –  I think it’s pretty obvious that there are many city leaders that just don’t think bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is important.  This was made clear with the design of City Center, which contains virtually no bicycle infrastructure.  One can only conclude then that they don’t agree with the vision.  Some may say that it’s not a lack of agreement, but rather a focus on other priorities like building City Center.  The problem with this argument is that the Vision itself says that multi-modal transportation will help attract high quality business and boost economic activity.  Surely this applies to City Center!  These goals should have been integrated from the beginning into the City Center plan.

2) Plans with a 20+ year horizon are not effective – It’s fine to have a 20 year vision, but it needs to be followed up with 1 year, 3 year, and 5 year strategic plans with specific actions.  This allows you define specific actions, develop specific plans, and measure your progress.  I’m not sure how/if the Vision 2030 plan was translated into specific actions, bit it appears from the outside that there is a disconnect between the vision and the action of the city.

I recently about the 20/20/20 plan that was developed to improve the bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure in Wyndotte county.  It specifies very specific goals that can be tracked.  They even provide a tracking tool on their website so everyone can see the progress.

Vision 20/20/20

Vision 20/20/20

3) It’s easier to set a Vision than it is to keep a Vision

Everyone enjoys developing a vision; but when it’s time to roll up your sleeves and take the actions necessary to realize the vision people lose interest.  This is especially true when your time horizon is so far in the future.  But, what good is a setting a vision when you don’t take the necessary actions to keep the vision.  In fact, isn’t keeping the vision the most important part of the vision?  This reminds me of one of my favorite Seinfeld bits.

4) There is no accountability – The city spends a lot of time and money to put together these plans.  But, there are no mechanisms in place to hold the city and the city council accountable for delivering.  As citizens, we can voice our concerns and vote, but unless our elected officials are listening and willing to take action there will be no progress.

So what do we do about it?

The good news is we have a common vision!    If we accept the Vision 2030 plan as a starting point we are on the right track.  The recent plans to begin discussing complete street initiatives could move us closer toward the goal. We have 13 years left to meet the vision for 2030 that was established by the citizens nine year ago.  It’s time for ACTION!  We are ready, let’s move forwad!

But wait….not so quick……the city has started to working on a Vision 2040 plan.  I say, what’s the point of working on Vision 2040 plan when we have taken no action on the Vision 2030 plan.  I think that’s just another way to focus on talk and avoid action.  Let’s kick the can down the road a little further rather than figure out how to move the current vision forward.  I would suggest that our time an energy is better spent focusing on delivering on the goals set out for 2030.

You can view the complete Vision 2030 plan here.

Keep in mind these are my thoughts as a read through the 2030 plan.  I’m not an expert on city planning and I’m sure there are many points on both sides of the discussion that I am missing.  But, my hope is that we have a honest discussion about how we can move from talk and vision setting to action.

To follow along on this discussion please join the i Bike Lenexa Facebook group.

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Here are the comments I presented during the “business from the floor” part of the August 15, Lenexa City Council meeting:

I Bike Lenexa is a community group focused on making Lenexa more bicycle and pedestrian friendly. We want to be a positive voice of change promoting safe cycling, raising driver awareness, and promoting cycling as a viable form or transportation.

We believe that bicycle friendly communities: attract families to the community; improve economic activity for local businesses; promote healthy lifestyles and reduce healthcare costs; reduce traffic congestion; and foster social connections within the community. Many cities and towns around the world, in the United States, across the state, and in our local area have proven that bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure can transform communities and achieve all of these benefits.

We believe that Lenexa has fallen behind in this area and that we need to start working together to make progress.

I Bike Lenexa is committed to working closely with the City Council, local businesses, and other community groups to advocate for improvements to on-street and off-street bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

We want to thank the City Council for their willingness to listen to our concerns. We want to extend an offer to work with the City Council to develop a comprehensive complete streets bicycle and pedestrian plan and to provide input on any planned road or infrastructure projects.

I also want to extend an invitation for you to join our Facebook page so that you can see and hear firsthand the feedback and comments from our 120 member (and growing) group.

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Wheeling Ramp

While I have been pretty vocal about the lack of on-street bicycle infrastructure in Lenexa, I also want to take the time to point out some of the great things that we do have.   Lenexa has over 40 miles of excellent multi-use trails.  Today, while I was riding on the Little Mill Creek trail I noticed something that I was not aware of.  The trail terminates with a long stairway leading up to 87th street.  Until today I have always taken a side path through a neighborhood to avoid carrying my bike up the long stairway.  But, today I realized that the stairway now has a wheeling ramp that allows you to push your bike up the stairway.  Apparently the ramp was added the last time the stairway was rebuilt.   The ramp has probably been in place for a few years, but I have always gone around out of habit.  I want to show my gratitude to the city for adding this small but very useful detail to the trail.

 

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Thanks to the work of several i Bike Lenexa members we believe that the ordinance prohibiting bicycles at Lenexa City Center will be removed from the City Council consent agenda for Tuesday’s City Council meeting. However, we need everyone to contact their council member to ensure that they understand our concerns and our willingness to work with them to come up with a better solution. You can put together your own message or feel free to cut and paste the message below. You can find your council member contact information here.

 

Dear Council Representative,

I am contacting you with concerns about the ordinance amending the Lenexa City Code regarding bicycles, roller skates, and skateboards. I believe that the ordinance as written will discourage cyclists from visiting the area and it sends the wrong message that Lenexa City Center is not bicycle friendly. The community group “i Bike Lenexa”, of which I am a member, has offered to work with the city council to help craft an ordinance that achieves the intended goal without discouraging cyclists. Please support our request to remove the item from the consent agenda for the August 15 City Council meeting.

Regards,
Your Name.

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Several i Bike Lenexa members have contacted the mayor and City Council members for clarification on the proposed ordinance banning bicycles, skateboards, roller skates, and scooters at City Center.   You can read my original post about the ordinance here.

Mayor Mike Boehm responded to our questions very quickly and clarified that the intent was not to restrict or discourage people from using bikes as a mode of transportation.  Rather, the City Council is trying to address the issue of people using the Civic Center infrastructure as a “skate board park”.  They have already seen some youth using bikes and skate boards to perform stunts off of the ramps, benches, walls and other features.  Obviously, the city is concerned about the liability, damage, and safety issues that could result from this type of improper usage.

I think everyone would agree that this is a legitimate concern that our City Council should address.  However, the ordinance as it is currently written seems to go to far.   The ordinance could be interpreted as a general prohibition on cycling and it sends a message that City Center is not bicycle friendly.

Because of the confusion that the current language may cause we have requested additional time to provide our input to improve the ordinance.   We are also offering to work with the City Council to come up with language that addresses the intent, but is also doesn’t prohibit normal usage of bicycles at City Center.

At this time we believe the City Council will take us up on our offer and remove the ordinance from consideration at the August 15, City Council meeting.  I believe that this is the right step and it also gives us an opportunity to work with the City Council in a positive way to make this ordinance better.

We are still hoping to have a strong presence at the August 15 City Council meeting, so please plan to attend if you can.  Also, feel free to ride your bike to the meeting.

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bikes prohibited

The Lenexa City Center has been a sore spot for cyclists in Lenexa.  The project is supposed to represent the central gathering place in the city, but very little thought went into how cyclists and pedestrians would access it.  The new roads at city center consists of three lanes of traffic in each direction with parking on both sides of each street.  There are also multiple massive parking garages.  However, there are no bicycle lanes!

Now, the city council is proposing an ordinance to prevent the usage of bicycles and skateboards within the city center campus. The council will vote on the ordinance at the August 15, 2017 city council meeting.   Here’s a link to more information about the ordinance.

Here’s some language from the ordinance summary:

“Staff has encountered problems with individuals riding bicycles and skateboards within the civic campus and causing damage to the benches, railings and other public facilities within the civic campus. In addition, a hazard to pedestrians will be created if use of such devices is allowed. Staff has determined that prohibiting bicycling, roller blading and skateboarding within the civic campus is necessary to maintain a safe environment for civic campus users and to proactively deter and prevent further damage to the City’s facilities.

The actual language of in the ordinance is much more severe. It actually refers to bicycles and other devices as a public nuisance!

bikes are a public nuisance!

bikes are a public nuisance!

The proposed ordinance indicates that cyclists have caused damage to the benches, railings and public facilities — really?  I understand how riding skateboards on city furniture could cause damage, but I don’t understand how normal use of a bicycle on the sidewalks would cause damage.

The ordinance also indicates that bicycles present a hazard to pedestrians on the sidewalks and that they should be prohibited in order to provide a safe environment.

“The proposed ordinance will make it unlawful for any person to ride, skate or otherwise use a motorized or non-motorized bicycle, coaster, roller skates, roller blades, skateboard, scooter or other similar device upon the sidewalks, parking garage and other facilities within the Lenexa civic campus. For the purposes of this prohibition, the proposed ordinance defines the civic campus as the area between Winchester Street and Penrose Lane and between Eastbound West 87th Street Parkway and 88th Street. The use of such devices for transportation purposes will still be permitted upon the sidewalks immediately adjacent to and abutting the public streets identified above.”

While the ordinance prohibits bicycles on the sidewalks within the City Center Campus, it does allow for bicycles on the sidewalks around the perimeter.   This begs the question; if bicycles present a hazard to pedestrians on the sidewalk within city center, why then are they not also a hazard to pedestrians around the perimeter?  Also, if bicycles are responsible for damaging the sidewalks within the city center interior, why then are they not also causing damage to the sidewalks around the perimeter.  If their concerns about safety and property damage are legitimate, shouldn’t bicycles be banned from ALL sidewalks and public areas throughout the city?

Perimeter area where bicycles are permitted

While I am not a proponent of riding bicycles on the sidewalk, in many parts of Lenexa this is the only safe alternative.  This is especially true around City Center where 87th street is more like a freeway than a city street.   I think it sends the wrong message that bicycles are dangerous on the sidewalks and are responsible for damage to city facilities.  This ordinance needs to be completely reconsidered to address the legitimate concerns about damage without prohibiting normal usage on the sidewalks.   This also one more indication about how the city council views cyclists.

 

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After 25 years working in downtown Kansas City I starting commuting by bicycle earlier this year.  I can’t believe I waited so many years to make this move.  I’ve found the benefits to be many.  I’m working on a post to describe my commute along with some video I shot of my ride in.   In the meantime here’s a great article about a recent study that found enormous health benefits of bicycle commuting.

“Research has consistently shown that people who are less physically active are both more likely to develop health problems like heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and to die younger. Yet there is increasing evidence that physical activity levels are on the decline.

The problem is that when there are many demands on our time, many people find prioritising exercise difficult. One answer is to multi-task by cycling or walking to work. We’ve just completed the largest ever study into how this affects your health.”

“We found that cycling to work was associated with a 41% lower risk of dying overall compared to commuting by car or public transport.”

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KCTV5 Interview

Stephanie Kayser, a reporter from KCTV5, came out to Lenexa to learn more about “i Bike Lenexa“.  The story aired multiple times throughout the day.   My goal with the interview was to bring awareness to the fact that Lenexa has fallen behind the rest of the metro in building bicycle infrastructure.  I also wanted to explain that we are just a group of cyclists that want to be a positive voice for change and that we are hoping to work with the city council to make progress.  I was very happy with how the interview turned out.  I want to thank Stephanie for taking the time to help bring some attention to our cause.

Here’s the partial story that aired in the morning

I’ve asked for the full story that aired in the afternoon.  I’ll post the link when I get it.

 

 

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Roxie Hammel at the Kansas City Star wrote a great story about i Bike Lenexa’s efforts to make Lenexa more bicycle friendly.  Here’s my favorite quote from the piece.

“I started a grass-roots community as a way to communicate and talk about what we’d like to see,” he said. So far there are about 80 people in it, he said.

The city has invested heavily in building the City Center development, with little attention to how someone might access it by bicycle or on foot, Carroll said. He also pointed to the 87th Street Parkway overpass over Interstate 35 as one that could be improved for pedestrians and cyclists.”

The response to the article has been incredible.  We have added almost 20 new members to the i Bike Lenexa Facebook group and we have been contacted by several bike advocate programs and news organizations.   It’s great to see that there is so many people who share our vision.

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/community/joco-913/article163615268.html#storylink=cpy
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Lenexa - on-street bicycle infrastructure

i Bike Lenexa is a Facebook community group focused on making Lenexa, Kansas more bicycle friendly. We want to be a positive voice for change promoting safe cycling, raising driver awareness, and encouraging cycling as a viable form of transportation.  The group is interested in working with the Lenexa City Council and other community groups to develop and execute a comprehensive bicycle and pedestrian plan that will transform our streets and make cycling a viable form of transportation.  

In order for us to be successful it’s important that we elect city council members that share our vision and will support our efforts.   On August 1, Lenexa will hold primaries for ward 2 and ward 4 council members.  There are 3 candidates for each ward.  We have developed a series of simple questions and asked each of the candidates to respond.  All candidates were given two weeks to respond and I sent a reminder two days prior to the due date.  We received responses from 4 of the 6 candidates.  I have copied their answers below and added any additional comments that they included in their email response. I have also included their contact information from the Johnson County Election Office website.   If you want to comment on any of these responses please do so on the i Bike Lenexa Facebook page.

On behalf of the i Bike Lenexa members I want to thank the candidates that responded for taking the time to do so!  I know that this information will be helpful in making voting decisions.

PLEASE REMEMBER TO VOTE!  Our participation in these elections is critical to achieving the improvements that we all want to see!

Council Member – Ward 2 (4 Year Term) *** PRIMARY ***

Stacy Knipp (Incumbent)
21112 West 90th Street, Lenexa, KS 66220
(913) 593-7192 (c)

***EDIT*** (RESPONSE FROM STACY KNIPP WAS RECEIVED AFTER INITIAL POST WAS PUBLISHED)

1. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life. Many of our peer communities have achieved Bicycle Friendly designations from the League of American Cyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Program. Specifically, Shawnee, Lawrence, Topeka, and Manhattan have all achieved Bronze level designations. Overland Park has recently approved a bicycle Master plan which designates significant dollars to improving bicycle infrastructure. Many other cities in the area are actively developing designated bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure. However, Lenexa does not have a bicycle plan, has almost no on-street bicycle infrastructure, and is falling behind cities across the state. What will you do to support making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation?

“I think it is important for me to make sure bicycle plan is included in a Complete Streets Plan. Right now, we have some rudimentary adaptations for cyclists but the place I think I can make the most impact encouraging the incorporation of bicycle friendly streets in future developments. At the June 14th Committee of the Whole meeting, I also thought it was worth looking into bike lanes on our trails, particularly the Mill Creek Trial system. This is a great trail system for all cyclists however at this point in time due to the mixed users of the trail, it is most suitable for recreational/leisure riders but is not so great for the event training riders. Because many of our training cyclists go long distances at fast speeds, incorporating bicycle infrastructure on our more “country” roads, especially as the agriculture land becomes more developed, makes it so it is always a part of the landscape of the community vs. being retrofitted, which seems to be much more expensive than doing it from the get go. Further, I think it is important to work with our neighboring municipalities…bike friendly needs to be more than Lenexa and I am willing to take the steps to bring other communities into the conversation. There could be funding opportunities that open up if we work together but as a minimum, it makes it so our whole area is known as bike friendly, not just Lenexa.”

2. Will you support the designation and development of on-street bike routes across Lenexa to support bicycle commuting and to connect key destinations like Old Town Lenexa and Lenexa City Center? These may include signed routes, sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes.

“I do support on-street bike routes but have concerns about the cost of adding bike lanes. I think it is very important to determine how many people would be taking advantage of a bicycle opportunity. I do believe signed routes could be a huge step forward because of the ability to give recognition to everyone to pay attention to bicyclists on the road (safety) and awareness that we even have designated routes could be very encouraging for folks to incorporate cycle transportation in their lives. Another concern I have is getting fellow communities to participate. If we have bicycle friendly streets but our cyclists can’t get to them, I’m not sure what we have achieved as many of our business employees are not residents of Lenexa. Although I do have strong concerns, the flip side of the coin is that sometimes “if you build it, they will come” is the right mind set. Any plan that comes together has to keep the many complexities of the City in order to work and be successful.”

3. Will you support the allocation of funds for the development and implementation of a comprehensive bicycle plan?

“Again, if the plan is thoughtful in its design and takes into account the needs and abilities of our City balanced with the needs and abilities of our residents, I would be able to support it.”

4. Will you support the allocation of funds to support programs to educate Lenexa residents on bicycle safety and to promote bicycles as a transportation option?

“Definitely. It is amazing how educating a community opens minds to all the possibilities and even if it is something that is not for them, it becomes something that is understood and accepted.s and abilities of our residents, I would be able to support it.”

Bill Nicks
21310 West 98th Street, Lenexa, KS 66220
(913) 424-9228 (c)

***EDIT*** (RESPONSE FROM BILL NICKS WAS RECEIVED AFTER INITIAL POST WAS PUBLISHED)

1. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life. Many of our peer communities have achieved Bicycle Friendly designations from the League of American Cyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Program. Specifically, Shawnee, Lawrence, Topeka, and Manhattan have all achieved Bronze level designations. Overland Park has recently approved a bicycle Master plan which designates significant dollars to improving bicycle infrastructure. Many other cities in the area are actively developing designated bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure. However, Lenexa does not have a bicycle plan, has almost no on-street bicycle infrastructure, and is falling behind cities across the state. What will you do to support making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation?

“I would support the study of making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation.  A professionally done study/questionnaire to help us determine and gauge the need would be foremost.”

2. Will you support the designation and development of on-street bike routes across Lenexa to support bicycle commuting and to connect key destinations like Old Town Lenexa and Lenexa City Center? These may include signed routes, sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes.

“The concept of on street bike routes is a good concept.  I would want to study such aspects as: the need, the benefits, the cost, how employers encourage such commuting, how we educate motorists, bicyclists, pedestrians, truckers in their use, how we build new, how we retro-fit, how north-south routes merge with east-west routes etc.”

3. Will you support the allocation of funds for the development and implementation of a comprehensive bicycle plan?

“Once a professionally administered study/questionnaire gauges the need and benefits of such a comprehensive bicycle plan, I would evaluate funding.  I would add the development of such a plan to the list of other city needs.”

4. Will you support the allocation of funds to support programs to educate Lenexa residents on bicycle safety and to promote bicycles as a transportation option?

“Absolutely–health and safety educational efforts are the best bang for the buck that governments invest in.  For example the vast majority of us wear seat belts now and second hand smoke is nearly a thing of the past.  Both of those are the result of educational efforts.  I consider bicycle safety in the same category.”

 

Dale J. Romme
15405 West 89th Place, Lenexa, KS 66219
(913) 492-3138
(913) 304-1278 (c)

1. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life. Many of our peer communities have achieved Bicycle Friendly designations from the League of American Cyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Program. Specifically, Shawnee, Lawrence, Topeka, and Manhattan have all achieved Bronze level designations. Overland Park has recently approved a bicycle Master plan which designates significant dollars to improving bicycle infrastructure. Many other cities in the area are actively developing designated bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure. However, Lenexa does not have a bicycle plan, has almost no on-street bicycle infrastructure, and is falling behind cities across the state. What will you do to support making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation?

“First let me say, it’s disappointing our Lenexa municipality hasn’t been more invested and a champion of bicycling infrastructure regarding road build-outs and upgrades while our neighboring communities have been. ​If elected to the Lenexa City Council, please know I’d be an advocate for the study and completion of a comprehensive and master bicycle plan for Lenexa. Furthermore upon completion of this plan, the City Council would have the opportunity to make some decisions based on a cost benefit analysis.  Additionally, I would support education via city-wide signage for motorists to “Be considerate and Share the Road with Bicyclists.”

2. Will you support the designation and development of on-street bike routes across Lenexa to support bicycle commuting and to connect key destinations like Old Town Lenexa and Lenexa City Center? These may include signed routes, sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes.

“As a Lenexa City Council member, I would support signed routes and sharrows, but I would have to further understand the cost to create bike lanes and buffered bike lanes.”

3. Will you support the allocation of funds for the development and implementation of a comprehensive bicycle plan?

“I would absolutely support the allocation of funds to undertake and complete a comprehensive and master bicycle plan for the City of Lenexa. I would see this activity as the onset of possibly re-branding Lenexa as a
bike-friendly municipality​ upon possible completion of some of the plan’s recommendations.”

4. Will you support the allocation of funds to support programs to educate Lenexa residents on bicycle safety and to promote bicycles as a transportation option?

“I would absolutely support the allocation of funds to develop and implement bicycle safety education programs for Lenexa residents and to promote the use of bicycles as an alternative means of transportation.”

Additional Comments:

“By the way, I enjoy taking early morning bike rides west from Lackman Road on 95th Street / Prairie Star Parkway to Clare Road and sometimes further.”

 

Council Member – Ward 4 (4 Year Term) *** PRIMARY ***

Samuel Phillip Davis
10863 Richards Court, Lenexa, KS 66210
(913) 210-0775

1. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life. Many of our peer communities have achieved Bicycle Friendly designations from the League of American Cyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Program. Specifically, Shawnee, Lawrence, Topeka, and Manhattan have all achieved Bronze level designations. Overland Park has recently approved a bicycle Master plan which designates significant dollars to improving bicycle infrastructure. Many other cities in the area are actively developing designated bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure. However, Lenexa does not have a bicycle plan, has almost no on-street bicycle infrastructure, and is falling behind cities across the state. What will you do to support making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation?

“I have a particular fascination with the bicycling element of cities since it promotes such great exercise and is family friendly (the whole family can participate). I used to live in Lawrence KS and they had an incredible bicycle infrastructure and would have no problem supporting developing something like that. I could see this also being actively used by our law enforcement “bike cops”.”

2. Will you support the designation and development of on-street bike routes across Lenexa to support bicycle commuting and to connect key destinations like Old Town Lenexa and Lenexa City Center? These may include signed routes, sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes.

“Yes”

3. Will you support the allocation of funds for the development and implementation of a comprehensive bicycle plan?

“Yes – rolled out over time through a multi year phase (such as maybe a 5-10 yr rollout) if we are to do something as comprehensive as the program in Lawrence.”

4. Will you support the allocation of funds to support programs to educate Lenexa residents on bicycle safety and to promote bicycles as a transportation option?

“Yes – especially since eventually bicyclists will be in closer proximity to traffic.”

Additional Comments:

“As for me, while my biking abilities are questionable at best, I did live in Lawrence, KS a few years ago and was thoroughly impressed with their bicycling infrastructure that spanned the whole city. My family and I enjoyed watching a major racing event that went through Mass Street and it was obvious that biking was a very big deal throughout Lawrence.”

“With that said, I could support setting up an infrastructure similar to Lawrence.”

Michael Elliott
8943 Widmer Road, Lenexa, KS 66215
(913) 490-0091

1. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life. Many of our peer communities have achieved Bicycle Friendly designations from the League of American Cyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Program. Specifically, Shawnee, Lawrence, Topeka, and Manhattan have all achieved Bronze level designations. Overland Park has recently approved a bicycle Master plan which designates significant dollars to improving bicycle infrastructure. Many other cities in the area are actively developing designated bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure. However, Lenexa does not have a bicycle plan, has almost no on-street bicycle infrastructure, and is falling behind cities across the state. What will you do to support making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation?

“If elected I plan to work with the city Parks and Rec department and public works/Streets department to development a comprehensive bicycle plan for Lenexa. This plan will ensure, as a point of city policy, that all future road projects take biking improvements into consideration. Lenexa has been actively reworking many streets in older (eastern) Lenexa in recent years with no apparent consideration of biking needs. For example, when 87th Street was redone from Pflumm to I-435 several years ago much attention was paid to center landscaping medians without consideration of whether this extra lane space could be used to add bike lanes. This would not have been a major financial strain for this project since curbs and lanes were being moved and adjusted anyway. A comprehensive bike plan would have forced biking considerations into this street project.”

2. Will you support the designation and development of on-street bike routes across Lenexa to support bicycle commuting and to connect key destinations like Old Town Lenexa and Lenexa City Center? These may include signed routes, sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes.

“Yes. While designated lanes are preferable, having at least a marked route adds a comfort level for less experienced riders and encourages more people to bike (and can be implemented at minimal cost). As a candidate in Ward 4 (older/eastern Lenexa) this is a quality of life issue for residents in my area are missing out on compared to newer areas of the city.”

3. Will you support the allocation of funds for the development and implementation of a comprehensive bicycle plan?

“While I oppose unnecessary government spending and wastefulness, if Lenexa spent less money running its own restaurants (Public Market) and bribing companies (tax abatements) it would have plenty of budget room for items that directly affect quality of life for many more residents- such as biking improvements. Yes, I support this allocation of funds for a bicycle plan as part of an overall budget shift to fund items that government SHOULD be doing rather than things they should not. If companies moving to Lenexa ARE granted tax abatements for any reason I would like to see a stipulation added that, where possible, any new construction be done with bicycle commuting taken into consideration (i.e. buildings and grounds made bike friendly and company has a plan to encourage bicycle commuting). The status quo city budget (supported by my opponent) leaves no room for this.”

4. Will you support the allocation of funds to support programs to educate Lenexa residents on bicycle safety and to promote bicycles as a transportation option?

“I believe innovative bicycle education programs could be implemented at minimal cost via the excellent Parks and Rec Department that Lenexa already has- it simply takes a will and desire among the leadership to do so. The Lenexa PD could also be involved in safety education.”

Mandy Stuke (Incumbent)
13301 West 91st Street, Lenexa, KS 66215
(913) 492-9519

1. Making bicycling safe and convenient are keys to improving public health, reducing traffic congestion, improving air quality and improving quality of life. Many of our peer communities have achieved Bicycle Friendly designations from the League of American Cyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Program. Specifically, Shawnee, Lawrence, Topeka, and Manhattan have all achieved Bronze level designations. Overland Park has recently approved a bicycle Master plan which designates significant dollars to improving bicycle infrastructure. Many other cities in the area are actively developing designated bike lanes and other bicycle infrastructure. However, Lenexa does not have a bicycle plan, has almost no on-street bicycle infrastructure, and is falling behind cities across the state. What will you do to support making Lenexa a bicycle friendly city that encourages the use of bicycles for transportation and recreation?

“In order to make Lenexa a bicycle friendly city, I will continue to support the study of “Complete Streets.” The city currently utilizes principles of “Complete Streets” in the design of public infrastructure without having a formal “Complete Streets” resolution in place. City staff provided a presentation at the June Committee of the Whole meeting that detailed the current standards that are utilized as we began our study of the complete streets concept. In addition, those in attendance at that meeting were asked to provide their valuable insight and guidance for future reference. Further study has been agreed upon, with questions to be included in our next Citizen Survey that will help to determine the support of residents versus the financial impact of additional amenities. This information will allow for us to make educated decisions on working towards next steps and the potential adoption of a “Complete Street” resolution.”

2. Will you support the designation and development of on-street bike routes across Lenexa to support bicycle commuting and to connect key destinations like Old Town Lenexa and Lenexa City Center? These may include signed routes, sharrows, bike lanes, and buffered bike lanes.

“I am open and receptive to the concept of on-street bike routes across Lenexa that support bicycle commuting and the connections of key community destinations. Multiple factors must be studied, addressed and brought into consideration, as this will be imperative as the city considers a“Complete Streets” resolution.”

3. Will you support the allocation of funds for the development and implementation of a comprehensive bicycle plan?

“I cannot appropriately answer this question in regards to the specific allocation of funds without further study and discussion. The financial and logistical constraints in creating such a plan must be carefully studied and understood prior to any implementation of such a resolution.”

4. Will you support the allocation of funds to support programs to educate Lenexa residents on bicycle safety and to promote bicycles as a transportation option?

“I support the education of the residents of Lenexa on bicycle safety and the ways in which bicycles are utilized in our community. Bringing awareness, understanding, along with the explanation of rights and responsibilities of all parties involved on the road (i.e. bicyclists, pedestrians, drivers, etc.) will be of great benefit to bicyclists and citizens alike.”

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